News On The Wing: September 2019

piZap_1567711349904Highlights from this month’s issue of News On The Wing include:

  • #CITESCoP18 highlights
  • The Trump Administration’s proposed changes to the #EndangeredSpeciesAct
  • Fires in the Amazon Rainforest
  • Updates & initiatives from global wildlife organizations
  • Wildlife, Forests and Marine Conservation issues
Here’s a snippet of what you’ll find in this month’s edition. 
Audubon Society – @audubonsociety
These images from the Audubon Photography Awards captured birds in breathtaking scenes and fascinating behaviors. Have you seen all 100? ow.ly/kt5w30p9Iay

Image

Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week: Migration — National Geographic Society Newsroom

As the Southern Hemisphere approaches spring, the north is getting into autumn. This marks an important time for bird migration. Migration is the regular seasonal movement, often north and south, undertaken by many species of birds. Bird movements include those made in response to changes in food availability, habitat, or weather. Thank you to all…

via Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week: Migration — National Geographic Society Newsroom

News On The Wing: August 2019 Edition

This month’s edition of News On The Wing brings together a wide-ranging roundup of wildlife and environmental conservation and protection, gardening tips, and of course some cute animal photos. Grab a coffee, sit back, and catch up on what’s been happening in the world of wildlife and nature.

Here’s a sneak peak: Image

From the Audubon Society – @audubonsociety
There are 300 million fewer seabirds today than there were in 1950. Species such as Atlantic Puffins rely on fish to survive, but they often can’t find enough to eat. Stand up for the Forage Fish Conservation Act today: ow.ly/vvpt30oURML #SaveTheSeabirds

Hummingbirds in the Real World: evolution, physiology and relationship — GardenRiots

Hummingbirds are clearly fascinating and engaging creatures. They are biological wonders of ‘invention’, little gems that sparkle in their airborne dances through sunlight, with the seductive power to capture the attention of even the most incognizant of us lumbering earthbound humans, including many of those pretty much blind to the natural world. I did not […]

via Hummingbirds in the Real World: evolution, physiology and relationship — GardenRiots

News On The Wing – May 2019 Edition

The May 2019 Edition of News On The Wing covers a wide range of wildlife, plants, sea life, and woodland-related topics.  So grab a cup of java and catch up on the issues affecting and threatening biodiversity on Earth, such as:
Image
Woodland Trust – @WoodlandTrust
Hazel #dormouse numbers have declined by a third since 2000. Help us save the #woodland homes of the #wildlife we love this #spring woodlandtru.st/DT1yt #StandUpForTrees
AND from:
The Wildlife Trusts – @WildlifeTrusts
Offer live food to garden birds to help replace declining natural food supplies. They contain crucial moisture and can be taken back to the nest for chicks. Our friends

have a range of food and feeders to choose from. wtru.st/2I6vdAg Image: Nicholas Watts

Image

Click here to read the May, 2019 edition of News On The Wing.

Decline in curlew birds as farming ‘destroys habitat’ — BBC News – UK

 

Curlew landing on a fence
Curlew  landing on a fence.  RSPB Cymru   The curlew is the largest European wading bird, recognisable by its long, down-curved bill and long legs  

The number of curlews in Wales has dropped by 80% since 1990 with farming practices partly to blame, a charity has said.

RSPB Cymru has called for farmers to be rewarded for creating suitable habitats for the bird when a new payments scheme comes into force after Brexit.

It is estimated only 400 breeding curlew pairs are left in Wales.

The Farmers’ Union of Wales (FUW) said nature should not be prioritised at the expense of the rural economy.

RSPB Cymru has been working on National Trust-owned land in Ysbyty Ifan, Conwy county, to restore curlew habitats.

It claims the bird’s decline was due, in part, to farming practices.

“[It is linked to] how hay is harvested as silage earlier on in the year, but there’s also been a decline in invertebrates, which is food for the curlew,” said Sabine Nouvet, an ecologist with the trust in Snowdonia and Llyn.

The Welsh Government has consulted on proposals for the agricultural payments system – due to replace the Common Agriculture Policy – and will consult further later this year.

via Decline in curlew birds as farming ‘destroys habitat’ — BBC News – UK

News On The Wing – April ’19 Edition

ephoto_1552237583487From tree netting to saving the Komodo Dragon, our April News On The Wing is chalk full of all the current wildlife and nature preservation news!

News On The Wing is comprised of information gathered from across social media.  It’s purpose is to share info, start conversations and encourage active participation in the protection of our natural world!  We hope you enjoy the April edition!

If you have a story or issue you’d like highlighted in News On The Wing, please send a DM to us on Twitter @TheRoost10